The Jazz with F. Scott Fitzgerald

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High School students and scholars of the jazz-crazy 1920’s have been reading the books of F. Scott Fitzgerald for decades now. His books like Tales Of The Jazz Age (1922) and The Great Gatsby (1925) helped define an era to succeeding generations.
A few years ago we came upon a bit of information which recounted how in February 1939 Fitzgerald came here to New Hampshire. He arrived in Grafton County 60 years ago this month looking to co-write a screenplay based on the Dartmouth Winter Carnival. What he found instead was the bottom of a bottle, and a career that had all but ended in the snows of New Hampshire.

The story of F. Scott Fitzgerald which Donna tells this month is culled from numerous sources. Fitzgerald’s tormented final years have been well documented in articles and books, yet it is a story often over looked here in New Hampshire.
It was 20 years ago this month that i found myself in a remote section of Coos County, waiting for a carload of Russians. That scene has come back to me on occasion over the years, especially during the events which led to the collapse of the Soviet Union a decade ago. That day in February 1979 is the subject of this month’s “Spot Light.”

We first met Coram Bond when he was a selectman for the town of Whitefield. Coram has been very active over the years, serving as a director of the North Country Council and chairman of the council’s Transportation Committee. But all who know him recognize Coram as one of the region’s great railroad boosters. He has worked tirelessly to try and bring the trains back to New Hampshire. This month our writer, Susan Zizza, visits with Coram and recalls how his father, George, worked with the Maine Central, which led Coram into his lifelong love for the rails. Also, Susan tells us about her personal link with the Maine Central through here great-grandfather, Harold Carbee, who worked for the same line. These were real railmen the likes of which we’re not likely to see again.

Our thanks to Roland Young of Bechtel and Dick Anderson of Barton & Gingold for helping us with our story about the building of the Portland Natural Gas Pipeline. It was through Barton & Gingold that we secured the fine photos by Chris Ayres which accompany our story.

We had a great time visiting with Red Sox baseball great Rico Petrocelli during his visit to the Balsams last month. It was a chance to spend some time with a real sports professional.

We also note the loss of our friend, Bob Moore, in our “Tribute” this month.

Read our next entry here.

Charles J. Jordan 
Editor